Posted in Happy parenting

Is Physical Punishment OK?

Physical punishment involves the use of physical force with the intention of causing a child to experience bodily pain or discomfort so as to correct or punish the child’s behavior. This includes spanking, hitting, pinching, paddling, whipping, slapping, and so on.  

Is Physical Punishment OK?

Is hitting a Child Ever OK? It is a big question for every parent. I wrote this question as a poll in different social sights and I found that thankfully a views are not much towards spanking.   Views vary sharply, with very little common ground. No one wants to scold or hit their child for fun. This question rises when it comes to child discipline, and just about everyone has a strong and often emotional opinion.

While most people deny the use of physical punishment as a form of child discipline, more people do spank their kids than they let on.

Most define spanking as any physical contact that involves striking a child for the purpose of stopping a behavior or action or getting their attention.

Views of physical punishment opposers:

Most child psychologists, pediatricians, so-called parenting experts, educators and middle-class parents oppose physical punishment as according to them:

  • Spanking can cause life-long emotional damage to a child. 
  • Sometimes it can cause physical damage as well.
  • Hitting a child teaches them to become violent adults.

 Plus, spanking opponents argue, there are plenty of other ways to discipline a child who is acting inappropriately.

Views of supporters of physical punishment: 

Supporters of spanking are often the ones who think that if they as children have been disciplined through spanking, it is OK to do the same with their children too. 

  • Supporters say that spanking, when used appropriately, creates a better sense of discipline and doing the right thing in children. 
  • Proponents also argue that occasionally spanking a child who is acting unsafely or terribly does not make them child abusers or parents with anger problems. 
  • They also point to how well-behaved their child is, especially compared with out-of-control, disrespectful and tantrum-prone youngsters whose parents keep threatening them with “time-outs” or “going to bed early” without changing the behavior.

Who Uses Physical Punishment as a Form of Child Discipline Today?

It’s hard to know exactly what percentage of parents or caregivers (like grandparents) actually spank a child, because many who do, don’t admit to it. 

But essentially, people who spank, at least occasionally, include:

  1. Caregivers from older generations, who were spanked as children and believe that they turned out to be absolutely fine.
  2. Grandparents and even older parents whose parents spanked them appropriately indicate they remember the experience, and as a result, effectively learned to not repeat the same inappropriate child action again.
  3. Parents of multiple young children, who spank but usually refer to it as an occasional “smack” or “slap” rather than spanking. These parents indicate that they only correct their children this way only when it involves an inherent danger to a child (themselves or others. An example of this is a parent who smacks a child’s hand who is about to touch a hot stove.
  4. Caregivers (parents or any adults) may also spank a child when, after being disciplined using another method, deliberately repeat the same behavior, as if to antagonize the parent. An example is a child who runs through a store (yes, it happens) and pulls things down from shelves, after being told not too repeatedly. 

Why Is This Such an Emotional Issue?

Child Protective Services or even the police have been called to investigate situations where an adult spanks a child in public. Well-meaning adults may intervene when the situation may or may not call for it. There is a fine line and considerable judgment involved when a spanking becomes abuse.

Parental rage, brought on by an out-of-control child, can result in horrible and tragic results. At the same time, a swat on the backside to stop a really bad behavior isn’t abuse, although some may still insist it is.

Is Physical Punishment OK?

Until the last 10 to 20 years (depending on the school), corporal punishment was routinely used in the classroom to put an immediate halt to inappropriate behaviors. 

Now, most, if not all, schools ban the use of corporal punishment and even designate their stance opposing it in their informational handbooks.

Whether or not you strongly oppose any type of physical punishment, support it in very limited cases, or like many parents, publicly decline its use but privately have used it at least once on a defiant or out-of-control child, the controversy surrounding it isn’t likely to end for generations to come.

If you have a strong opinion about physical punishment of any type and under any circumstances with a child, be sure to convey that to your child’s caregivers (family providers, nannies, babysitters, or friends). At the same time, be prepared to indicate what alternative measures you permit.

Too many previously successful child care arrangements have ended because of a lack of communication about allowable child care discipline strategies. And, if your parents spanked you on occasion but you adamantly oppose it with your child, don’t just assume the child’s grandparents will just know your position. Get it out in the open before they take on child care duties.

If hitting a child is not wrong, then nothing is wrong. 

8 Alternative ways to Discipline without Spanking

Posted in Happy parenting

Discipline Alternatives to Physical Punishment

Discipline Alternatives to physical punishment. Physical punishment is a major public health problem in this country. Approximately 60 percent of adults still approve of physical punishment, despite compelling evidence that it does not work, it makes things worse, and there are effective alternatives.  

Discipline Without Physical Punishment - 8 Alternative Ways

Spanking is a euphemism for hitting. One is not permitted to hit one’s spouse or a stranger. Why in the world should one be permitted to hit a smaller and even more vulnerable child?  

Studies show that children who are hit identify with the aggressor and are more likely to become hitters themselves, i.e., bullies and future abusers of their children and spouses. They tend to learn to use violent behavior as a way to deal with disputes.   

Is hitting a Child Ever OK? 

Hitting is one of the most widely debated and sensitive parenting topics. While most pediatricians and parenting experts don’t recommend spanking. But still majority of parents around the world admit to spanking their kids. We can include spanking, hitting, pinching, paddling, whipping, slapping, swats, smacks, the popping of the hands on head as different forms of physical punishment.

Discipline Alternatives

It is a big question for every parent. This question rises when it comes to child discipline, and just about everyone has a strong and often emotional opinion.

For many parents, slapping can feel like the fastest and most effective way to change a child’s behavior. And it often works in the short-term. But, studies show corporal punishment has long-term consequences for kids.

8 Discipline Alternatives

If you’re looking for alternative ways to Physical Punishment, these are eight ways to discipline your child without slapping.

1. It’s Time-Out

There are lots of ways to discipline children without spanking them.

Hitting kids for misbehavior (especially aggression) sends a mixed message. Your child will wonder why it’s OK for you to hit your child but not OK for your child to hit her sister.

Time-out can be used as a better alternative. But in order for time-out to be effective, kids need to have plenty of positive time-in with their parents. Then, when they’re removed from the situation, the lack of attention will be uncomfortable and that discomfort could remind them to behave better in the future.

If it is done properly the child will learn to calm himself down, which is a useful life skill.

2. Ignore Mild Misbehavior

You can ignore attention-seeking behavior. Selective ignoring can actually be more effective than spanking.This doesn’t mean you should look the other way if your child is doing something dangerous or inappropriate. 

It just means don’t pay attention to their activities. When your child tries to get attention by whining or complaining, don’t give it to him. Look the other way, pretend you can’t hear him, and don’t respond.

Then, when he asks nicely or he behaves, return your attention to him. Over time, he’ll learn that polite behavior is the best way to get your attention.  

8 Discipline Alternatives

3. Take Away Privileges

Although hitting hurts for a minute or two, taking away a privilege hurts longer. Take away the TV, video games, his favorite toy or a fun activity for the day and he’ll have a reminder not to repeat that mistake.

Make it clear when the privileges can be earned back. Usually, 24 hours is long enough to teach your child to learn from his mistake.

So you might say, “You’ve lost your time to play with your favorite toy for the rest of the day but you can earn it back tomorrow by picking up your toys the first time I ask.”

4. Teach New Skills

One of the main problems with spanking is that it doesn’t teach your child how to behave better. Spanking your child because he threw a temper tantrum, won’t teach him how to calm himself down the next time he’s upset.

Kids benefit from learning how to problem-solve, manage their emotions and compromise. When parents teach these skills it can greatly reduce behavior problems. Use discipline that is aimed at teaching, not punishing. 

8 Discipline Alternatives

5. Provide Logical Consequences

Logical consequences are a great way to help kids who are struggling with specific behavior problems. Logical consequences are specifically tied to the misbehavior. 

For example, if your child doesn’t eat his dinner, don’t let him have a bedtime snack. Or if he refuses to pick up his trucks, don’t allow him to play with them for the rest of the day.

Linking the consequence directly to the behavior problem helps kids see that their choices have direct consequences. 

6. Allow for Natural Consequences

Natural consequences allow children to learn from their own mistakes.  For example, if your child says he’s not going to wear a jacket, let him go outside and get cold—as long as it’s safe to do so.

Use natural consequences when you think your child will learn from his own mistakes. Monitor the situation to ensure that your child won’t experience any real danger.

8 Discipline Alternatives

7. Reward Good Behavior

Instead of spanking a child for misbehavior, reward him for good behavior. For example, if your child fights with his siblings often, set up a reward system to motivate him to get along better with them.

Providing an incentive to behave can turn around misbehavior fast. Rewards help kids to focus on what they need to do to earn privileges, rather than emphasize the bad behavior they’re supposed to avoid.

8. Praise Good Behavior

Prevent behavior problems by catching your child being good. For example, when he’s playing nicely with his siblings, point it out. Say, “You are doing such a good job sharing and taking turns today.”

When there are several children in the room, give the most attention and praise to the children who are following the rules and behaving well. Then, when the other child begins to behave, give him praise and attention as well.

Posted in Happy parenting

9 Tips for spending quality time with your child

9 Tips for spending quality time with your child

Life is busy and between work and life responsibilities, the days pass us by in the blink of an eye. Parents have a common concern that they are not able to spend enough time with their children. They wonder if this could lead to developmental delays. Some parents feel guilty about working full time, or experience anxiety about choosing to work out at the gym or go to dinner with friends.

 9 Tips for spending quality time with your child.  Life is busy and between work and life responsibilities, the days pass us by in the blink of an eye. Parents have a common concern that they are not able to spend enough time with their children.
9 Tips for spending quality time with your child. Life is busy and between work and life responsibilities, the days pass us by in the blink of an eye. Parents have a common concern that they are not able to spend enough time with their children.
Photo by Daria Obymaha from Pexels

On top of that when you see a social media posts from stay-at-home parents who are able to take their children to the local zoo or work on colors and the alphabet with them only add to this anxiety.

But have no despair! Recent studies have shown that spending quality time is much more important than quantity of time. This is not to negate the importance of time spent with children. Children need high-quality time with parents and caregivers. Quality time spent with the parents and caregiver is most beneficial to children and it leaves a positive effect on them as they grow. It isn’t about endless hours of time but it’s about how you choose to spend that time that truly matters.

As parents and caregivers, we can make choices to ensure time spent with our children is high-quality.

9 Tips for spending quality time with your child

1. “WE” Time 

     Have a daily “WE” time with your child. Do this face-to-face, if possible; but if this isn’t an option, create a routine for doing so in other ways, such as leaving a note in your child’s lunch bag, posting a note by his toothbrush, or writing an encouraging saying on a shared whiteboard in the house.

2.     Daily Ritual

     Create a special ritual for you and your child—something that can be done every day. For example, let your child choose and read one book with you at bedtime.

3. Say the magic word daily

     Tell your child you love her every day. And tell her how important she is to you and how she makes you feel.

4. Reinforce positive behavior

     For example, if your child completes his chores without your asking, do acknowledge it with words of appreciation.

5. Meal Minutes

     Make and eat meals with your children whenever possible. If time is limited, look for simple meals that require very little preparation, or grab a healthy snack such as an apple and sit for a few minutes and chat with your child.

6. “You Choose” Activity

     Schedule time for doing an activity of your child’s choosing. Be sure to follow through and complete the activity without any distractions.

7. Play with your child

     Play with your child, even if it’s during bath time or outside before you drop her off at preschool. Every little bit of time makes a positive impact!

8. Be Silly

     Laugh and be silly with your child.

9. NO-Tech.

     Turn off technology when you spend time with your child. Try not to text, answer calls, scroll through social media, or watch television.

To make your relationship stronger with your child you need to spend quality time with them, not quantity of time. Keep it simple and connect with your child in ways that make sense for your lifestyle and relationships. Each connection has a lasting impact and provides the support and reassurance* that your child needs.

Parents play a very important role in their child’s life.

Happy parenting is every parent’s delight.

All the best wishes to you on this amazing journey. This will surely give us an easy life.

If these tips help you in finding your answer, please comment. You can also comment, if you are having any other questions related to parenting. 

Posted in Happy parenting

What should be the parent’s role in a child’s life?

Although a parent’s role in their children’s learning evolves as kids grow, one thing remains constant: we are our children’s learning models. Our attitudes about education can inspire theirs and show them how to take charge of their own educational journey.

What should be parent’s role in child’s life?
Although a parent's role in their children's learning evolves as kids grow, one thing remains constant: we are our children's learning models.
Parent’s Role in Child’s life: Although a parent’s role in their children’s learning evolves as kids grow, one thing remains constant: we are our children’s learning models. Our attitudes about education can inspire theirs and show them how to take charge of their own educational journey.
Photo by Agung Pandit Wiguna from Pexels

Parent’s Role in Child’s life

“Parents can inspire kids to grow up to love learning and do well in school, by paying less attention to the actual specifics of the homework, but instead by creating learning-rich environments in and outside of the home.”

Be a role model for learning

In the early years, parents are their children’s first teachers — exploring nature, reading together, cooking together, and counting together. When a young child begins formal school, the parent’s job is to show him how school can extend the learning you began together at home, and how exciting and meaningful this learning can be. parents become their children’s learning coaches, as preschoolers grow into school age kids. Parents help their kids organize their time and support their desires to learn new things in and out of school, Through guidance and reminders.

Pay attention to what your child loves

 A parent can do is notice her child. Find out if he is a talker or is he shy? Find out what interests him and help him explore it.

Tune into how your child learns

By paying attention to how your child learns, you may be able to pique his interest and explain tough topics by drawing pictures together, creating charts, building models, singing songs and even making up rhymes.

Many children use a combination of modalities to study and learn:

  •  Some learn visually through making and seeing pictures, 
  • others through tactile experiences, like building block towers and working with clay. 
  • Still others are auditory learners who pay most attention to what they hear. 
  • And they may not learn the same way their siblings (or you) do.

Practice what your child learns at school

Many teachers encourage parents to:

  • go over what their young children are learning in a non-pressured way, and 
  • to practice what they may need extra help with. 

This doesn’t mean drilling them for success, but it may mean:

  • going over basic counting skills, multiplication tables or letter recognition, depending on the needs, and
  • Reviewing the topics depending upon the learning level of your child. Please note, reviewing is different from being a drill machine.
  • And when you do review, your child should be willing to do it. There is no use of sitting for hours when your child is not present there mentally.

Set aside time to read together

Setting some time to read together really helps with: 

  • Spending some productive time with your child 
  • This will improve reading skills of your child.
  • Read aloud regularly, even to older kids.
  • If your child is a reluctant reader, reading aloud will expose her to the structure and vocabulary of good literature and get her interested in reading more. 
  • You read one chapter aloud, let your child read another to himself. 
  • Let kids pick the books they like. Book series are great for reluctant readers. 
  • It’s OK to read easy, interesting books instead of harder novels.

Parent’s Role in Child’s life

Connect what your child learns to everyday life

 Make learning part of your child’s everyday experience, especially when it comes out of your child’s natural questions.

  • When you drive in the car, count license plates and talk about the states. 
  • Do measuring math, when you cook together. 
  • When you turn on the blender, explore how it works together. 
  • When your child studies the weather, talk about why it was so hot at the beach. 

Have give-and-take conversations, listening to your child’s ideas instead of pouring information into their heads.

Connect what your child learns to the world

Find age-appropriate ways to help your older child connect his school learning to world events. Start by asking questions. For example, 

  • ask a second-grader if she knows about a recent event, and what’s she heard.
  • Then ask what she could do to help (such as sending supplies to flood victims). 
  • You might ask a younger child if he’s heard about anything in the news, and find out what he knows. 
  • Make your child aware of the green and sustainable lifestyle. 
  • Tell them why everyone should think about saving the planet Earth.
  • They should be taught to live with compassion towards all living beings around us

This will help your child become a caring learner.

Help your child take charge of his learning

Encourage your child to make decisions, be around and vigilant, and guide them if they are taking decisions that could really harm them. You can try by telling your child that:

  • Your child should be in charge of their learning and become responsible for it. This includes their daily home work.
  • We want them to be responsible for their successes and failures,
  • Show them how engaging learning is, and
  • That the motivations for learning should be the child’s intrinsic interests, not an external reward.”

Don’t over-schedule your child

While you may want to supplement school with outside activities, be judicious about how much you let or urge your child to do.

  • Kids need downtime as much as they may need to pursue extra-curricular activities.
  • If a child has homework and organized sports and music lessons to attend and then you want to enroll him to a drawing class by compromising his play time, it can quickly become a joyless race from one thing to another. 

Therefore, monitor your child to see that he is truly enjoying what he is doing. If he isn’t, cut something off the schedule.

Parent’s Role in Child’s life

Keep TV to a minimum

It is thought that at present time, you get a lot of information through the internet and informative channels in T.V. 

It is true that a lot of information is served to us and we enjoy that with our eyes. But for it to reach to our brains, we need to do some thinking too. And for that do need to keep yourself from a lot of screen time.

  • Watching lots of TV does not give children the chance to develop their own interests and explore on their own, because it controls the agenda. 
  • Unstructured time with books, toys, crafts and friends allows children to learn how to be in charge of their agenda, and to develop their own interests, skills, solutions and expertise.

Learn something new yourself

Learning something new yourself is a great way to model the learning process for your child.

  • Take up a new language or craft, or read about an unfamiliar topic. 
  • Show your child what you are learning and how you may be struggling. 
  • You’ll gain a better understanding of what your child is going through and your child may learn study skills by watching you study. 
  • You might even establish a joint study time.

Happy parenting is every parent’s delight.

All the best wishes to you on this amazing journey. This will surely give us an easy life.

If these tips help you in finding your answer, please like and comment. You can also put your queries related to parenting in the comment box.

Posted in Happy parenting

5 ways child will stop biting.

When your child bites, you feel bad for the way your child is behaving and also for the victim who nurses a throbbing red mark. You want your child to stop biting. Other parents are appalled. You wish you could just sink into the ground. For your child’s age, this could be the most antisocial work. Understanding why a child bites is key to beating the problem. Not all children bite out of anger or to hurt another child – in fact kids can’t really understand how much pain they’re causing.

5 ways child will stop biting.

 this article will tell you about 5 ways the child will stop biting habit.
5 ways child will stop biting.
this article will tell you about 5 ways the child will stop biting habit. As a parent, to stop biting habit of your child, you just need to understand the causes behind this. Just handle the situation calming next time. 5 ways to stop child from biting.
https://www.pexels.com/photo/red-stop-sign-39080/

As a parent, to stop biting habit of your child, you just need to understand the causes behind this. Just handle the situation calming next time. 

Read 5 Reasons Why do children bite?

In all instances, react swiftly, and keep your cool. Don’t ever – ever – bite back or hit – retaliation could be dangerous. “You’re just teaching them violence causes violence,” But don’t dodge the issue – children need to know immediately that what they have done is wrong.

Here are the 5 ways to stop child from biting:

1️⃣Intervene:

 You need to be observant, look how intense, how frequent the bites are and what are the targets. 

  • One of the best ways is to act before your child has a chance to sink their teeth into anyone. Parents might be slow at doing this, but it is always one of the best ways. 
  • Separate your child away from the person they’re about to bite. 
  • Don’t put them into large groups if that’s where it happens. Plan in advance for their behaviour.
  • Children often clench their teeth before they bite – an unmistakable sign. React swiftly.
  • Take the child somewhere quiet to calm down.
  • If a teething child is trying out his or her teeth, find toys to chew and chomp on.      

 2️⃣Teach them it’s wrong:

  • When your child bites, use simple but firm words. 
  • Try, “that’s biting, that’s wrong” or a firm “no”.
  • If you’re in a group, remove them from the situation. 
  • Explain that it hurts others and why you don’t like kids biting.

3️⃣Teach them to express themselves: 

When things have calmed down, try to help your child find a less painful way to express their feelings.

  •  If a child is biting to show his affection, there are chances he might not do this again.
  • *If your child’s expressing love, teach them to hug rather than bite whenever they feel strong emotions.
  • If your child bites out of defence, show them how to tell somebody they don’t want him or her too close. Teach them to make the “stop” sign (a hand held up) or ask them even gently to push the other child’s shoulder which won’t hurt but gives a clear message.
  • Teach them to come and find you instead if they’re angry.

4️⃣Reduce the effectiveness:

When children bite to gain attention, dealing with it is trickier. 

  • After the first big  incidence, don’t try to reason or explain.Give a firm “no”. 
  • Put your body between victim and biter and turn your back on the biter.
  • Give the victim sympathy and the biter a clear message this is an unproductive way of getting attention.

5️⃣If time-out is one of your methods:

*If time-out is one of your methods, now’s the time to use it.

  • *If the bite was over a toy or treat, remove it for a short while.
  • If a child tries to control his or her mum by biting, try physically putting a part of their body in the way as they go to bite – an arm or a leg, which will stop them in their tracks.

Now as you have read till here, this is an extra tip, which works wonders –

Praise them for good behavior”: Praise them for good behavior and see how the problem fades away. Beware, don’t over do it. 

When to ask for help: Don’t rush to a therapist; seek help or advice from friends and other parents, or teachers. This is very unlikely that you will fail after this, but if you do, then surely visit a therapist.

Happy childhood is every child’s right.

All the best wishes to you on this amazing journey. This will surely give us an easy life.

If these tips help you in finding your answer, please comment. You can also comment, if you are having any other questions related to parenting. 

Posted in Happy parenting

5 reasons why your Child BITES

When your child bites, you feel bad for the way your child is behaving and also for the victim who nurses a throbbing red mark. Other parents are appalled. You wish you could just sink into the ground. For your child’s age, this could be the most antisocial work. When your child bites, you feel bad for the way your child is behaving and also for the victim who nurses a throbbing red mark. When your child bites, you feel bad for the way your child is behaving and also for the victim who nurses a throbbing red mark. Other parents are appalled. You wish you could just sink into the ground. For your child’s age, this could be the most antisocial work.

If a child bites an apple it's OK, but biting others is not. Find about 5 reasons why your child bites.
If a child bites an apple it’s GOOD, but not when he bites someone else. Find about 5 reasons why your child bites. Photo by Saya Kimura from Pexels

Not all kids bite, but experts say up every 4th child will do at some stage – mostly between the ages of 2 & 3. It is a phase that passes by 4 yrs, most children have grown out of it. Some try the odd bite and move on, others grow into REGULAR biters.

And when we are talking about regular biters, it’s a serious issue. It hurts to see the victim in so much pain. This could also get your child kicked out of nursery. It doesn’t mean your child is a monster – many biters are otherwise gentle and sociable.

5 Reasons Why do children bite?

Understanding why a child bites is key to beating the problem. Not all children bite out of anger or to hurt another child – in fact kids can’t really understand how much pain they’re causing. “Question yourself what the child is gaining by biting,”

“Think what the reward is for him or her – does he get a huge amount of attention?”

Experts advise parents to try and see biting as a way of communicating rather than just bad behaviour – once we do that, we’ve got more choices in how to respond.

5 Reasons Why do children bite?

  1. Expressing emotion: Oddly enough, young toddlers can bite as a way of showing love. “Toddlers have really intense feelings but don’t know how to show them, “Biting can be a way of expressing their feelings. Mothers often don’t understand why it’s just them who get bitten.”
  2. Experimenting: Toddlers are learning how their body works – they put things in their mouths, and sometimes bite.  It’s impulsive and they don’t mean to hurt. Often, a baby bites someone when they’re teething. Sometimes toddlers bite when they’re over-excited.
  3. Defending: Young children learn to bite as a defence, especially if they can’t talk. Sometimes when children are late at learning to speak, they use biting as their defence. They bite whenever they are anxious or feeling threatened. These children are trying to establish a safety zone. Sometimes changes or upsets at home can bring on this type of biting. 
  4. Controlling: Some children know biting as a method of getting to do what they want from the other children or their parents. They don’t always do this consciously. It may happen when a group of children are jostling to be leader. Sometimes the youngest child in the family bites to gain power. Those who have done this, knows biting is a fantastic way of getting attention, even if it’s negative, still purpose solved.
  5. Frustrated or irritated: Your child wants a toy back. Or they want a biscuit or adult attention, or can’t cope with a situation. They may not understand turn-taking and sharing. Or things may have changed at home or the child feels under stress. Your child doesn’t necessarily mean to cause harm, but just can’t find the words to express themselves.

As a parent, you just need to understand the causes behind this biting habit. Just handle the situation calmly next time. Comfort your child. 

Read 5 ways to stop child from biting. 

Happy childhood is every child’s right.

All the best wishes to you on this amazing journey. This will surely give us an easy life.

If these tips help you in finding your answer, please comment. You can also comment, if you are having any other questions related to parenting. 

Posted in Schooling

What will child learn in playschool?

What will child learn in playschool? If you are wondering whether to send your child to a playschool or not, here’s what you should consider before making a decision.

What will child learn in playschool? Broadly these are the fields covered under a playschool academic routine:

Broadly these are the fields covered under a playschool academic routine:

Sensory Development

Sensorial Life utilizes specially designed sensorial material to develop the physical sense and the powers of observation.

This area enables the child to gain an understanding of:

  • Taste: sweet, sour, salty, bitter, etc.  
  • Hearing: pitch, tone, loud and soft, etc.
  • Sight:  long and short, broad and narrow, small and large, geometric shapes, etc.
  • Touch: smooth and rough, hot and cold, heavy and light, etc.
  • Smell: spices, herbs, flower scents, etc.

Basic Concepts

Mathematics is introduced to the child through concrete, manipulative terms that enable him/her to understand the basic concepts. More abstract forms are then used as the child progresses from numbers, quantity numerals to concepts such as place values. As the child progresses, he/she starts working with addition, subtraction, multiplication and division using specially designed materials. The emphasis is on understanding that en rote learning.

Language Development

Language spans every area of the programme though it is included in the basic skills. It encompasses verbal skills, visual perception and small muscle coordination. Beginning with listening games, training the hand with puzzles, the child is familiarized with the alphabets. Specially designed materials enable the child to gain an understanding of how separate sounds combined together to form words. This area helps in oral language development, written expression, reading and grammar.

Enrichments

Enrichments are an introduction to the basic elements of our world – land, air and water. At first, the children use large wooden puzzle maps of the continents. As they learn the names of the continents, and then move on to maps of countries. This is followed by a gradual learning about climate, people.

Cognitive Development

Practical Life introduces the child to task organization and cognitive order through exercises such as pouring, polishing, spooning and buttoning. The child develops concentration, muscular coordination and a sense of order.  This area also aids in learning care of self, care of the environment, control of movement and social relations.

This area is the foundation for subsequent academic learning because it provides:

  • A SENSE OF ORDER that is a task’s beginning, middle and end.
  • SENSE OF INDEPENDENCE that is “I can do it by myself”.
  • *A SENSE OF COORDINATION that is ” We are a team”, and I need to coordinate with others.

Child will learn in playschool a lot of new things for sure. It is a readiness program before the formal schooling.

 Also read: Is playschool education necessary?

Happy childhood is every child’s right.

All the best wishes to you on this amazing journey. This will surely give us an easy life.

If these tips help you in finding your answer, please comment. You can also comment, if you are having any other questions related to parenting.

Posted in Schooling

Is Playschool Education Necessary?

Should you send your child to a playschool? Here's what you should consider before making the decision.
Is Playschool Education Necessary?

Should you send your child to a playschool? Here’s what you should consider before making the decision.


A few decades ago, the concept of playschools in India was unheard of, and few children, if any, attended playschool. Still, everyone grew up into mature, sensible, well read and well-spoken adults. Now however it seems as if every parent sends their pre-nursery child off to a playschool.

Most playschools in India are privately owned, and expensive. If you are wondering whether to send your child to a playschool or not, here’s what you should consider before making a decision.

Time

Do you have a lot of time that you can devote to your child?

If both you and your spouse are working and you don’t have a lot of spare time, you may not be around to teach your child much – with the result that when your child starts school he may lag behind his classmates who have attended playschool. However, if one spouse is a stay-at-home parent and has the time to attend to the children and teach them, you could consider not sending your child to a playschool. Remember that very young children too have an incredible ability to learn. Their brains are remarkably sharp, and it makes sense to put them in an environment conducive to learning at this young age.

Playschool Education – Academic routine

When deciding which playschool to send your child to, try and find something that isn’t very academically inclined. Your child shouldn’t be struggling, trying to learn something like math at such a young age. Instead, find a play school that focuses on letting a child have fun while learning.

Playschool Education – Social opportunities

Play schools also provide an opportunity for children to socialize with other children. In addition, he will also gradually get used to the concept of a classroom in an informal manner, making his transition into school that much easier. So, if you live in an isolated neighborhood or in a place where there are not many other children your child’s age, it makes sense to send your child to playschool. Your child will learn to interact with numerous children at a young age.

Yes, the social benefits of sending your child to playschool are undeniable, but don’t expect miracles. If your child is shy, sending him to playschool will not automatically transform him into a confident person. In addition, you may find that there are other ways to help your child socialize. If you have membership to your local club for example, you could consider enrolling your child in sports.

Routine

Sending your child to a playschool helps ease him into a routine earlier on. However, remember that even if your child doesn’t go to playschool initially, 12-14 years of schooling followed by college will get him accustomed to a routine anyway. Whether or not he continues with the discipline depends on his innate nature and the job he takes up – and not on whether he has been to playschool or not.

What’s the point of homework?

Happy childhood is every child’s right.

All the best wishes to you on this amazing journey. This will surely give us an easy life.

If these tips help you in finding your answer, please comment. You can also comment, if you are having any other questions related to parenting. 

Posted in Schooling

What’s the point of homework?

Wondering how to help your children with homework — or how to get them to do it without a struggle? Here’s how.

Wondering how to help your children with homework — or how to get them to do it without a struggle? Here's how.

What’s the point of homework?

“Homework is designed to help students reinforce key concepts, process and solidify new information, provide time for extra practice of skills, and reflect on how much they’ve learned,” notes teacher Susan Becker, M.Ed. However, approaches to homework vary from district to district, school to school and teacher to teacher. Some schools don’t give children homework until the 2nd grade, others start in kindergarten. Some teachers create original homework, while other use or modify prepared work sheets.

Don’t do the homework for your child.

Most teachers use homework to find out what the child knows. They do not want parents doing their children’s homework but do want parents to make sure homework is completed and review any mistakes to see what can be learned from them.

Don’t take over your child’s projects.

Teachers do not want parents doing their kids’ projects. Instead, they want parents to support their kids’ learning and make sure they have what they need to accomplish a task. Check with your child’s teacher for his policy and review it with your child.

Set up a good space to work.

All children need the same thing: a clean, well-lit space. But keep in mind that each child may work differently; some will do their work at the kitchen table and others at their desks in their rooms.

Pay attention to your child’s rhythms and help him find the right time to begin his work.

Some children will work best by doing homework right after school; others need a longer break and must run around before tackling the work. Most will need a snack. If your child does after-school activities, set a homework time before or after the activity, or after dinner. Whatever routine you choose, help your child stick to it.

Find out how your child studies best.

“You should find the ways your child likes to study. For example, some kids will learn spelling words by writing them out, others by closing their eyes and picturing them and saying them aloud,” . “The sound environment is also important,” .”Some kids may want to listen to music, some are helped by being in the middle of noise, others need absolute quiet.” These are some of the advises by the experts.

Don’t hover — but stay close by.

Keep in mind that it’s their homework, not yours, but remain available in case you are needed. “The ideal set up would be for a parent to be reading nearby while the child is studying because then you both are doing your educational work together, but that’s not always possible,” says Michael Thompson, Ph.D. “A parent may be working out of the home, or need to be working in the home and cooking dinner. So if you are home, stay close, and if you are not there, have another adult check to make sure it’s going OK. And remember that all homework is not equal, so not everything will need your rapt attention.”

Limit media exposure.

Turn off the TV and the iPod when your child does homework. And the computer too, unless it’s being used for research. You might start by asking how much time he thinks he should spend on this, and negotiate from there. Remember, you have the final word. And keep in mind that if you watch TV when your child can’t, the plan may backfire.

Let the teacher know if you gave your child a lot of homework help.

“If your child needs extra help or truly doesn’t understand something, let the teacher know. Write on the assignment, ‘done with parental help,’ or write a separate note,” advises experts. If your child resists, explain that homework is used to practice what you know and to show the teacher what you need help learning more about — so it’s a parent’s job to let the teacher know.

Happy childhood is every child’s right.

All the best wishes to you on this amazing journey. This will surely give us an easy life.

If these tips help you in finding your answer, please comment. You can also comment, if you are having any other questions related to parenting. 

Posted in Happy parenting

Children need to play, but this doesn’t require toys

Children need to play, but this doesn’t require toys.

Children need to play, but this doesn't require toys. They will explore their environment and examine articles that are interesting to them- from pots to pans to blocks."
“Children need to play, but this doesn’t require toys. They will explore their environment and examine articles that are interesting to them- from pots to pans to blocks.” says Deborah MacNamara, author of “Rest, Play, Grow” a manual for parents.  Before having my son, I was determined!
A Happy childhood is the most precious gift we can give to our child. Photo by Rene Asmussen from Pexels

“Children need to play, but this doesn’t require toys. They will explore their environment and examine articles that are interesting to them- from pots to pans to blocks.” says Deborah MacNamara, author of “Rest, Play, Grow” a manual for parents.  Before having my son, I was determined!

This means that children can find a lot of things to play with at home. they can play with things like cardboard pieces, pots, pans, blocks and many other things.

Children of different ages can use cardboard boxes, plastic bowls and lids, collections of plastic bottle caps, and other “treasures”.

As children grow, their relationships with toys change. While babies are mostly preoccupied with being around the people they are attached to, they can also be content exploring things with their mouths and hands.

As toddlers, they become more and more interested in the exploration of objects. During this stage, the key is to give them access to open-ended things that foster imagination. If we like to provide actual toys, things like building blocks, nesting cups, dolls or stuffed animals are good options.

children don’t need prescribed minimum number of toys to play . They played with each toy longer, allowing them to focus more and play more creatively. Parents should allow their children to gravitate towards the toys or objects that interest them.
A Happy childhood is the most precious gift we can give to our child. Photo by Rene Asmussen from Pexels