Parent Involvement In Early Education

Parent involvement in the early childhood education. Today parents are more aware and involved than they’ve ever been with their children’s development. 

Preschool years are the most important years of a child’s development. Most important cognitive development happens during these preschool years. Parents can help their child to grow to  their full potential, by getting involved actively in the early childhood education process,

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Why is it very important that parent stay involved in their child’s Early Childhood Education?

Except for when it comes to preschool.

Many parents just stay involved in dropping their preschooler off to school in the morning while the teachers take over, and then pick them up at the end of the day. To get the true benefits from early childhood education, parents can include some practices at home.

The Benefits of Parent Involvement in Early Childhood education

Preschool years are the most important years of a child’s development. Most important cognitive development happens during these preschool years. Parents can help their child to grow to  their full potential, by getting involved actively in the early childhood education process,

  • Parent involvement helps extend teaching outside the classroom.
  • Their involvement creates a more positive experience for children.
  • Involvement helps children perform better when they are in school.

Involvement of parent is essential in learning what is happening in the preschool setup, as 

  • Parents support is essential in the learning that happens in preschool settings at home as well.
  •  Parents involved in happening of their child’s preschool classroom or child care facility can establish better connection between what is learned at school and what takes place in the home.
  •  This connection is a key component of a child’s development and supporting further learning.

How does it affect a child?

Not only does family or parental involvement help extend teaching outside the classroom; it creates a more positive experience for children and helps children perform better when they are in school.

Some parents who are in search of preschools for their child, do researches before selecting a school, these researches commonly involve questions like:

Hope you find answers for your query if you are also looking for a early education center or looking for shifting to a better choice.

RIGHT AGE

What is the Right Age to Send Your Kid to Play School or School?

Right age. Speaking of maturity, this component is a major one. School readiness exists if your answer to these clues is affirmative

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What is the Right Age to Send Your Kid to Play School or School?

Every mom thinks that her child should be the best one and learn everything at the proper age. So she started thinking to send her baby to play group or school.

Parents generally start to think of this once their child has crossed first year of his life or when they see some other young kids going to a play school. Generally this a conversation starter to moms who meet each other in the garden during evening strolls. Play School is quite a confusing term for people who know that it is also the name of a toy brand.

But right now the play school that we are referring to is a nursery school that children attend for just a few hours per day. As warranted by the age group, the educational component is not very rigid. Really, deciding whether and when to send your kid to play school is more contingent upon other factors, and here’s what you need to know. 

The School Requirements

The school likely has a certain age requirement for the playschool program, whether it be 18 months or two years. Generally, schools are pretty strict with their requirements, so your child will need to make the cut-off date. Let’s say only children who will be 2 years old by December 31 are permitted to join, and your child was born on December 29. When birthdays fall that late in the year, you usually have the option to wait an additional year. Whether or not to do so depends on the maturity of your child.

Maturity Level

Speaking of maturity, this component is a major one. Of course, no toddler is going to be super mature, but some can be mature for their age. If your child still desperately needs to be around you at all moments, it might be better to find a gentle separation program first. However, on the other hand, children who have a strong sense of independence often thrive from such programs. There are some clues that you can use to determine your child’s school readiness age. 

Educational and Recreational Needs

You must also consider where your child is in terms of educational and recreational development. For example, if he or she has never socialized with children of the same age, if he or she is the only child with both parents being working, if he or she is the only child at home then all such cases going to a play group is a very good idea. Children get to meet other children of the same age, starts to interact with them. It has been seen that this kind of setup also helps a child with a speech-delay.

The General Age

There is a general age slab for admission in pre primary age. Play schools generally allow children from age 18 months to 2 years as their youngest enrolls, where as many formal schools have lower Kindergarten as their entry level class. 

When you are considering sending your child to playschool, the first step is to find out if he or she even qualifies based on his or her age. If you’re still uncertain about this decision, call the school to see if they offer trial sessions or a program where you can stay with your toddler for the first few days.

Why is it very important that parent stay involved in their child’s Early Childhood Education?

RIGHT AGE. What is the school readiness age for your child ?

. It is easy for parents to answer this. School readiness exists if your answer to these clues is affirmative:

What is the school readiness age for your child? This might sound a bit tough at first please. But know that it is the term that makes it sound difficult to understand. It is easy for parents to answer this. School readiness exists if your answer to these clues is affirmative:

  • Is your child able to communicate verbally with adults and other children?
  • Is your child toilet trained to some extent?
  • Does your child have enough independence to be separated comfortably from parents for the length of the play school day?
  • *Does your child have a sense of confidence and an ability to begin to do tasks alone?
  • Does your child have a desire to explore and have new experiences outside the home?
  • Have your child developed the beginnings of an ability to relate to other children?
  • Does your child have the ability to deal with the physical demands of a new environment, such as climbing stairs?
  • Have your child developed the ability to stay focused on an activity or enjoy rhymes?
  • Does your child express a desire to go to school?
  • Is the child used to staying with people other than the mother like grand mother or maid?
  • How easily she catches a cold from other people? 
  • Is the child comfortable with other people except mom and dad for 1-2 hours?

Please note that the parent’s desire/ need to send a child to play school is different from the child’s readiness to go.

Sending a child to play school before she is ready to go could result in severe psychological damage to the child.. You can think of sending her for short durations if you feel she is not getting enough interactions with other children and you are not able to stimulate her enough because of your work schedule.

As your child grows you will have less and less control on his educational environment. In play school you do. Choose the play school keeping in view benefits to the child rather than future worries.

What to look for in a good play school?

Don’t go merely by the name tag or brand name of the play school in the belief that admission to regular schools will be easier thereafter.
Get reliable recommendations from parents whose children have studied in your shortlisted school.
  • Don’t go merely by the name tag or brand name of the play school in the belief that admission to regular schools will be easier thereafter.
  • Get reliable recommendations from parents whose children have studied in your shortlisted school. 
  • Talk to the children themselves and see whether they seem happy and interested.
  • Find out whether the curriculum of the play school concentrates on all round development (including social, emotional, intellectual and physical) or only on securing admission to a regular school?
  • Are the classrooms attractive for children?
  • *Are children exposed to activities that encourage self-expression and development of a full range of motor skills?
  • Are children exposed to books, reading, writing, counting, music, science and nature on a regular basis?
  • Is there a dedicated area for safe, vigorous physical activity and an adequate supply of equipment. Are children supervised?
  • What is the teaching environment like? Are children allowed to be creative or think for themselves?
  • What is the ratio of teachers to children?
  • Are individual temperament based differences recognized?
  • Do the teachers question individual children and encourage them to expand their thinking and problem- solving skills?
  • Does the staff pay attention to the needs of the child?
  • How far is the play school from your residence? 
  • If meals are provided are they nutritious and varied?
  • Do the teachers pay attention to the children during mealtimes – making sure they finish their tiffin?
  • How is the behavior of teachers with the students?
  • Is the principle experienced as a teacher and as an administrator?
  • Does the staff welcome you as a participant, communicate regularly with you and respect your preferences and ideas? 

What are the rules and regulations followed and the fee structure for admission?

Each school has their own admission procedure and fee structure. 

What is the procedure followed for joining in pre-primary school? 

Admission procedure varies from school to school. You need to contact the school for admission procedure. Collect the application from the school, fill up the same and submit along with necessary documents. 

 Where to get this information?

You can get the information about the fee, curriculum and all other things usually on the school’s website or by personally visiting their office.

What are the necessary documents that are needed during admission to a play school? 

The list of necessary documents totally depends on a particular school, still here is a list of things you should carry with you during the admission process. Keeping these things ready beforehand will save your time, energy and multiple visits to the school office. 

  • photographs of your child
  • Family photograph
  • Birth certificate from a civic body
  • Blood Group report
  • Aadhar card number
  • Photocopy of ID proof of parents/Guardian
  • Address proof

This is just a tentative list, schools might demand more or less documents than the ones listed here.

What is the right class for the child in school?

In India, if the entry level class is LKG (Lower Kindergarten or KG 1) then, the right age would be between 3 to 4 yrs. Most schools keep this as 3yrs and 6 months around june end or during the beginning of new session. As this will be the average age of the class.

Before this age a child can only go to a play school or a school with a dedicated class to cater the needs for this age group. In most of the schools, this dedicated class is named as Nursery.

Normally, any  play school has an entry level class as a Playgroup. There are many different names for this level. The right age for Playgroup would generally be more than 1years 6 months to 2 years.

What is the right age for a child for getting admission in a Play Group?

Decision about admitting your child to a play group broadly depends on many factors. It depends on the level of understanding that particular child has. While considering age, kids of age between 1.5 yrs to 2 yrs and above can be admitted to play group. This again depends upon the readiness of a child and the entry age for a given play school.  It is normally seen that even kids of age 1.5 yrs go to a play group and adjust themselves very well.

Going to Play School also gives a tremendous boost to a child’s vocabulary. Children with cases of speech-delays also improve a lot better when around other kids of the same age. They learn to sing rhymes and songs all day long. Their eating habit and independence also improves by eating in the classroom with other kids. And these are the benefits other than the academic portions. 

If a child is smart and mature than folks of his age, is it OK to skip the entry level class and admit him directly to Kindergarten or primary school?

What is the right age for a child for getting admission in Nursery?

The minimum age limit for a child for getting admission in Nursery is 2.5 years. 

What is the right age for a child for getting admission in Lower Kindergarten/ LKG/ KG-1?

Please note that there is no specific age limit criteria for joining/admission in LKG. The minimum required age for getting admission in 1st standard in any CBSE school is more than 5 yrs and 6 months around June. So minimum required age for a child for getting admission in LKG is minimum 3.5 years. 

What is the right age for a child for getting admission in Upper Kindergarten/ UKG/ KG-2?

The required age for getting admission in UKG is 4.5 yrs. 

What is the right age for a child for getting admission in Class 1 / Grade I?

The minimum age required for getting admission in 1st class is 5.6 years and so on. Meeting the age criteria is a must for getting admission in CBSE based schools.  

The age limit varies with state. So, it’s better to visit school to get details for admission and eligibility criteria.

How To Discipline Your Child

It is important to stick to some form of discipline consistently for your child. Parents also need to stick to those rules and consequences, if they don’t, their kids aren’t likely to either.

How To Discipline Your Child At Different Ages.  It is important to stick to some form of discipline consistently for your child. Parents also need to stick to those rules and consequences.
How To Discipline Your Child At Different Ages. It is important to stick to some form of consistently for your child. Parents also need to stick to those rules and consequences.

You will find some ideas about how to vary your approach to discipline your child to best fit your family.

From ages 0 to 2 yrs

Ages 3 to 5 yrs

From ages 6 to 8 yrs

Ages 9 to 12 yrs

From ages 13 and Up

Discipline Without Physical Punishment One is not permitted to hit one’s spouse or a stranger. Why in the world should one be permitted to hit a smaller and even more vulnerable child?  Studies show that children who are hit identify with the aggressor and are more likely to become hitters themselves, i.e., bullies and future abusers of their children and spouses. They tend to learn to use violent behavior as a way to deal with disputes.   

Happy childhood is every child’s right.

Happy Parenting! All the best wishes to you on this amazing journey.

If these tips help you in finding your answer, please comment. You can also comment, if you are having any other questions related to parenting. 

Discipline – 9 to 12 yrs Old Child

How To Discipline Your Child

It is important to stick to some form of discipline consistently for your child. Parents also need to stick to those rules and consequences, if they don’t, their kids aren’t likely to either.

Discipline Your 9 to 12 yrs Old Child.  You will find some ideas about how to vary your approach to discipline your child to best fit your family.
Discipline Your 9 to 12 yrs Old Child. You will find some ideas about how to vary your approach to discipline your child to best fit your family.

You will find some ideas about how to vary your approach to discipline your child to best fit your family.

From ages 0 to 2 yrs

Ages 3 to 5 yrs

From ages 6 to 8 yrs

Ages 9 to 12 yrs

Just as with all ages, kids in this age group mature and request more independence and responsibility.They can be disciplined with natural consequences. 

What can be done:

  • Life Lessons are more valuable. Teaching them how to deal with the consequences of their behavior is an effective and appropriate method of discipline. For example, if your fifth grader’s homework isn’t done before bedtime, should you make him or her stay up to do it or even lend a hand yourself? Probably not — you’ll miss an opportunity to teach a key life lesson. If homework is incomplete, your child will go to school the next day without it and suffer the resulting bad grade. Don’t worry, some bad grades are OK, if they are giving life lessons to your child.
  • Mistakes do favor your child. It’s natural for parents to want to rescue kids from mistakes. Let your child make some mistakes and learn from them. Kids see what behaving improperly can mean and probably won’t make those mistakes again. 
  • Take away privileges. If your child does not seem to be learning from natural consequences, set up some of your own to help change the behavior. Removing privileges such as electronics can be an effective consequence for this age group.

Rule you should remember: 

Become friends with your child. At this age forcing rules will not work. Talk to your child about natural consequences of their behaviour. 

From ages 13 and Up

Happy childhood is every child’s right.

Happy Parenting! All the best wishes to you on this amazing journey.

If these tips help you in finding your answer, please comment. You can also comment, if you are having any other questions related to parenting.

Discipline – 6 to 8 yrs Old Child

How To Discipline Your Child

It is important to stick to some form of discipline consistently for your child. Parents also need to stick to those rules and consequences, if they don’t, their kids aren’t likely to either.

Discipline Your 6 to 8 yrs Old Child.  You will find some ideas about how to vary your approach to discipline your child to best fit your family.
Discipline Your 6 to 8 yrs Old Child. You will find some ideas about how to vary your approach to discipline your child to best fit your family.

You will find some ideas about how to vary your approach to discipline your child to best fit your family.

From ages 0 to 2 yrs

Ages 3 to 5 yrs

From ages 6 to 8 yrs

Some effective discipline strategies for this age group.

What can be done:

  • Timeouts: Timeouts can be effective discipline for toddlers. For example, if a child has been hitting, biting, or throwing food, should be told why the behavior is unacceptable and taken to a designated timeout area. A timeout can be a place like a kitchen chair or bottom stair. 
  • Consequences: Before you punish your child for their behavior, explain to them what you expect. For example, when your child uses crayons, she will use it on the walls. Don’t scold. Discuss why that’s not allowed. Tell them the consequences that what will happen if your child does it again (for instance, your child will have to help clean the wall and will not be able to use the crayons for the rest of the day). 
  • Consistency is crucial, as is follow-through. Follow your promises of discipline or else you risk undermining your authority. Kids have to believe that you mean what you say. You can give second chances or allow a certain margin of error, but for the most part, you should act on what you say.
  • Make realistic threats of consequences. Be careful not to make unrealistic threats like “You’ll never watch TV again!” in anger, since not following through could weaken all your threats. If you threaten to turn the car around and go home if the squabbling in the backseat doesn’t stop, make sure you do exactly that. The credibility you’ll gain with your kids is much more valuable than a lost outing.
  • Too much will not work. Huge punishments may take away your power as a parent. For example: If you ground your son or daughter for a month, your child may not feel motivated to change behaviors because everything has already been taken away. 

Rule you should remember: 

Set small goals. It may help to set some goals that kids can meet to earn back privileges that were taken away for misbehavior.

From ages 9 to 12 yrs

From ages 13 and Up

Happy childhood is every child’s right.

Happy Parenting! All the best wishes to you on this amazing journey.

If these tips help you in finding your answer, please comment. You can also comment, if you are having any other questions related to parenting. 

Discipline – 3 to 5 yrs Old Child

How To Discipline Your Child

It is important to stick to some form of discipline consistently for your child. Parents also need to stick to those rules and consequences, if they don’t, their kids aren’t likely to either.

You will find some ideas about how to vary your approach to discipline your child to best fit your family.

Discipline Your 3 to 5 yrs Old Child.  You will find some ideas about how to vary your approach to discipline your child to best fit your family.
Discipline Your 3 to 5 yrs Old Child. You will find some ideas about how to vary your approach to discipline your child to best fit your family.

From ages 0 to 2 yrs

From ages 3 to 5 yrs.

Now as your child is grown. He begins to understand the connection between actions and consequences. So start communicating the rules of your family’s home to him in simple ways.

What can be done:

  • Before you punish your child for their behavior, explain to them what you expect. For example, when your child uses crayons, she will use it on the walls. Don’t scold. Discuss why that’s not allowed. Tell them the consequences that what will happen if your child does it again (for instance, your child will have to help clean the wall and will not be able to use the crayons for the rest of the day). 
  • You can also give them a particular area to do her artwork. Just paste some self stick Vinyl wallpaper. Ask your child to limit herself to that portion. And let her do the cleaning also. Or otherwise if you want her to stay limited to paper if the wall gets decorated again, issue a reminder that crayons are for paper only. And then enforce the consequences. 
  • Consistency is the key to effective discipline. It’s sometimes easier for parents to ignore occasional bad behavior or not follow through on consequences, this sets a bad precedent. This way kids will test limits. It’s important for parents to decide (together, if you are not a single parent) what are the rules of the house and then uphold them. 
  • Discipline is not just about punishment, it’s also about recognizing good behavior. While you become clear on what behaviors will not be accepted, don’t forget to reward good behaviors. Never undermine the positive effect that your praise can have on your child. Like saying “I’m proud of you for sharing your toys at playgroup” works better than  punishing a child who didn’t share. 
  • Be specific when giving praise rather than just saying “Good job!” You want to make it clear which behaviors you liked. Being specific makes these behaviours more likely to happen in the future.

Rule you should remember: 

The more attention we give to a behavior, the more likely it is to continue.

If your child continues an unacceptable behavior no matter what you do,then try 

  • Making a behaviour chart with a box for each day of the week. Decide with your child how many times your child can misbehave before a consequence kicks in or how long the proper behavior must be seen before it is rewarded. Make entries in the chart and then track the good and unacceptable behaviors every day. This will give your child (and you) a concrete look at how it’s going. Once this begins to work, praise your child for learning to control misbehavior (especially for overcoming any stubborn problem).
  • For kids at this age timeouts also can work well. Pick a suitable timeout place that’s free of distractions, such as a chair or bottom step. Be alert on selecting a timeout place. “Getting sent to your room” isn’t effective if a computer, TV, or games are there. Also, remember a timeout is time away from any type of reinforcement. So your child shouldn’t get any attention from you while in a timeout  which includes talking, eye contact, etc.
  • Considering proper length of time for timeout is important. Be sure to consider what works best for your child. 

Experts say rule you should remember:

1 minute for each year of age or timeout until the child is calmed down (to teach self-regulation). 

What can be done:

  • It’s important to make sure that if a timeout happens because your child didn’t follow directions, you follow through with the direction after the timeout.
  • It’s important to tell kids what the right thing to do is not just to say what the wrong thing is. For example, instead of saying “Don’t jump on the couch,” try “Please sit on the furniture and put your feet on the floor.”
  • Don’t confuse your child. Be sure to give clear, direct commands. Instead of “Could you please put your shoes on?” say “Please put your shoes on.” This leaves no room for confusion and does not imply that following directions is a choice.

From ages 6 to 8 yrs

Ages 9 to 12 yrs

From ages 13 and Up

Happy childhood is every child’s right.

Happy Parenting! All the best wishes to you on this amazing journey.

If these tips help you in finding your answer, please comment. You can also comment, if you are having any other questions related to parenting. 

What’s the point of homework?

Wondering how to help your children with homework — or how to get them to do it without a struggle? Here’s how.

Wondering how to help your children with homework — or how to get them to do it without a struggle? Here's how.

What’s the point of homework?

“Homework is designed to help students reinforce key concepts, process and solidify new information, provide time for extra practice of skills, and reflect on how much they’ve learned,” notes teacher Susan Becker, M.Ed. However, approaches to homework vary from district to district, school to school and teacher to teacher. Some schools don’t give children homework until the 2nd grade, others start in kindergarten. Some teachers create original homework, while other use or modify prepared work sheets.

Don’t do the homework for your child.

Most teachers use homework to find out what the child knows. They do not want parents doing their children’s homework but do want parents to make sure homework is completed and review any mistakes to see what can be learned from them.

Don’t take over your child’s projects.

Teachers do not want parents doing their kids’ projects. Instead, they want parents to support their kids’ learning and make sure they have what they need to accomplish a task. Check with your child’s teacher for his policy and review it with your child.

Set up a good space to work.

All children need the same thing: a clean, well-lit space. But keep in mind that each child may work differently; some will do their work at the kitchen table and others at their desks in their rooms.

Pay attention to your child’s rhythms and help him find the right time to begin his work.

Some children will work best by doing homework right after school; others need a longer break and must run around before tackling the work. Most will need a snack. If your child does after-school activities, set a homework time before or after the activity, or after dinner. Whatever routine you choose, help your child stick to it.

Find out how your child studies best.

“You should find the ways your child likes to study. For example, some kids will learn spelling words by writing them out, others by closing their eyes and picturing them and saying them aloud,” . “The sound environment is also important,” .”Some kids may want to listen to music, some are helped by being in the middle of noise, others need absolute quiet.” These are some of the advises by the experts.

Don’t hover — but stay close by.

Keep in mind that it’s their homework, not yours, but remain available in case you are needed. “The ideal set up would be for a parent to be reading nearby while the child is studying because then you both are doing your educational work together, but that’s not always possible,” says Michael Thompson, Ph.D. “A parent may be working out of the home, or need to be working in the home and cooking dinner. So if you are home, stay close, and if you are not there, have another adult check to make sure it’s going OK. And remember that all homework is not equal, so not everything will need your rapt attention.”

Limit media exposure.

Turn off the TV and the iPod when your child does homework. And the computer too, unless it’s being used for research. You might start by asking how much time he thinks he should spend on this, and negotiate from there. Remember, you have the final word. And keep in mind that if you watch TV when your child can’t, the plan may backfire.

Let the teacher know if you gave your child a lot of homework help.

“If your child needs extra help or truly doesn’t understand something, let the teacher know. Write on the assignment, ‘done with parental help,’ or write a separate note,” advises experts. If your child resists, explain that homework is used to practice what you know and to show the teacher what you need help learning more about — so it’s a parent’s job to let the teacher know.

Happy childhood is every child’s right.

All the best wishes to you on this amazing journey. This will surely give us an easy life.

If these tips help you in finding your answer, please comment. You can also comment, if you are having any other questions related to parenting.